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September 14th, 2020 at the St. Johns Bridge in Portland, Oregon —currently the worst air quality in the world. 

Oregon is on fire. The most destructive wildfires on record in the state with over a million acres currently ablaze and dangerous air hanging over our cities. A result of climate change and forest mismanagement. Even in these dire conditions, Oregonians are showing strength of community by banding together to support evacuees and rescue workers. But much more is still needed, as we are only beginning to understand the devastation. Here are some ways to help make an immediate difference to those who've lost so much during this horrific time.  

Monetary Donation

Because of increased safety measures for COVID-19, storing, sorting, cleaning and distributing donated items could be risky. But the public can help by making a financial donation.

  • Northwest Response Fund —American Red Cross and news stations KGW8 (Portland) and KING-TV (Seattle) created this to support those affected by wildfires in both Oregon and Washington. Donating is as easy as texting the word “relief” to 503-226-5088. 
  • Southern Oregon Fire Relief Fund —started by the Rogue Credit Union to match up to $50,000 in relief donations for people impacted by the Almeda/Glendower and Obenchain fires. Donations will go to local nonprofits that are assisting impacted families and communities. 
  • United Way of Jackson County Fire Fundsupporting long-term recovery for families, covering direct expenses related to their losses. You can donate via PayPal, mailing a check (60 Hawthorne St., Medford, OR 97504) or making a deposit at any First Interstate Bank. 
    • Keep Oregon Green —donations will go to educating the public about wildfire prevention, with 100% of the money directed towards its outreach efforts and not operating costs. 

     

    Volunteer

    • American Red Cross —right now the most urgent needs are for licensed health professionals, blood donor support, shelter support and virtual positions. The organization’s six blood banks in Oregon are also accepting donations.

       

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